AStudyInFrank

"We the youthful sinewy races,
All the rest on us depend."

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agooddaytodie:

"On the shelves were the books bound in a cardboard-like material, pale, like tanned human skin, and the manuscripts were intact. In spite of the room’s having been shut up for many years, the air seemed fresher than in the rest of the house. Everything was so recent that several weeks later, when Úrsula went into the room with a pail of water and a brush to wash the floor, there was nothing for her to do. Aureliano Segundo was deep in the reading of a book. Although it had no cover and the title did not appear anywhere, the boy enjoyed the story of a woman who sat at a table and ate nothing but kernels of rice, which she picked up with a pin, and the story of the fisherman who borrowed a weight for his net from a neighbor and when he gave him a fish in payment later it had a diamond in its stomach, and the one about the lamp that fulfilled wishes and about flying carpets. Surprised, he asked Úrsula if all that was true and she answered him that it was, that many years ago the gypsies had brought magic lamps and flying mats to Macondo.
“What’s happening,” she sighed, “is that the world is slowly coming to an end and those things don’t come here any more.””
Good bye to Gabriel García Márquez, who died of pneumonia on April 17, 2014, aged 87…

agooddaytodie:

"On the shelves were the books bound in a cardboard-like material, pale, like tanned human skin, and the manuscripts were intact. In spite of the room’s having been shut up for many years, the air seemed fresher than in the rest of the house. Everything was so recent that several weeks later, when Úrsula went into the room with a pail of water and a brush to wash the floor, there was nothing for her to do. Aureliano Segundo was deep in the reading of a book. Although it had no cover and the title did not appear anywhere, the boy enjoyed the story of a woman who sat at a table and ate nothing but kernels of rice, which she picked up with a pin, and the story of the fisherman who borrowed a weight for his net from a neighbor and when he gave him a fish in payment later it had a diamond in its stomach, and the one about the lamp that fulfilled wishes and about flying carpets. Surprised, he asked Úrsula if all that was true and she answered him that it was, that many years ago the gypsies had brought magic lamps and flying mats to Macondo.

“What’s happening,” she sighed, “is that the world is slowly coming to an end and those things don’t come here any more.””

Good bye to Gabriel García Márquez, who died of pneumonia on April 17, 2014, aged 87…

(via thelyonrampant)

photo

agooddaytodie:

"On the shelves were the books bound in a cardboard-like material, pale, like tanned human skin, and the manuscripts were intact. In spite of the room’s having been shut up for many years, the air seemed fresher than in the rest of the house. Everything was so recent that several weeks later, when Úrsula went into the room with a pail of water and a brush to wash the floor, there was nothing for her to do. Aureliano Segundo was deep in the reading of a book. Although it had no cover and the title did not appear anywhere, the boy enjoyed the story of a woman who sat at a table and ate nothing but kernels of rice, which she picked up with a pin, and the story of the fisherman who borrowed a weight for his net from a neighbor and when he gave him a fish in payment later it had a diamond in its stomach, and the one about the lamp that fulfilled wishes and about flying carpets. Surprised, he asked Úrsula if all that was true and she answered him that it was, that many years ago the gypsies had brought magic lamps and flying mats to Macondo.
“What’s happening,” she sighed, “is that the world is slowly coming to an end and those things don’t come here any more.””
Good bye to Gabriel García Márquez, who died of pneumonia on April 17, 2014, aged 87…

agooddaytodie:

"On the shelves were the books bound in a cardboard-like material, pale, like tanned human skin, and the manuscripts were intact. In spite of the room’s having been shut up for many years, the air seemed fresher than in the rest of the house. Everything was so recent that several weeks later, when Úrsula went into the room with a pail of water and a brush to wash the floor, there was nothing for her to do. Aureliano Segundo was deep in the reading of a book. Although it had no cover and the title did not appear anywhere, the boy enjoyed the story of a woman who sat at a table and ate nothing but kernels of rice, which she picked up with a pin, and the story of the fisherman who borrowed a weight for his net from a neighbor and when he gave him a fish in payment later it had a diamond in its stomach, and the one about the lamp that fulfilled wishes and about flying carpets. Surprised, he asked Úrsula if all that was true and she answered him that it was, that many years ago the gypsies had brought magic lamps and flying mats to Macondo.

“What’s happening,” she sighed, “is that the world is slowly coming to an end and those things don’t come here any more.””

Good bye to Gabriel García Márquez, who died of pneumonia on April 17, 2014, aged 87…

(via thelyonrampant)

quote

There’s nothing “normal” about having a middle class. Having a middle class is a choice that a society has to make, and it’s a choice we need to make again in this generation, if we want to stop the destruction of the remnants of the last generation’s middle class. Despite what you might read in the Wall Street Journal or see on Fox News, capitalism is not an economic system that produces a middle class. In fact, if left to its own devices, capitalism tends towards vast levels of inequality and monopoly. The natural and most stable state of capitalism actually looks a lot like the Victorian England depicted in Charles Dickens’ novels.

The Middle Class Is Not ”Normal” (via azspot)

(via azspot)

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teenageguide:

"Someday I Suppose," Mighty Mighty Bosstones

Raise your hand if third wave ska played an important formative role in your life. (I’m looking at you, Travis Barker!) This is more or less the point at which I started developing my own tastes and standards, not just musically but pretty much across the aesthetic board. Before ska, it’s all just other people’s music. Sure, I had opinions about the stuff my parents would play in the car (never did get into Gloria Estefan…sorry, Mom!), and there were songs I’d hope to hear when I got control of the dial, but it wasn’t until a friend turned me on to ska that I felt like I was hearing something that really resonated with me, something that was truly mine.

Hang-UpsLosing StreakWhy Do They Rock So Hard?Life Won’t WaitLet’s Face It…feel free to substitute your own, but albums like these were my lifeblood by the time I got to high school. Ska had it all, man. It was snotty, it was catchy, it was goofy, it offered a way to sneak in the backdoor to punk without getting beaten up by those mohawk and leather types hurling themselves around VFW and KOC halls. Oh, and it had horns. What a sucker I was for the horns. Yes, for a few glorious years, we were, all of us, suckers for the horns. 

The Bosstones knew this. It’s why their videos focus on the brass the way some bands highlight guitar solos. Huge though their biggest single may have been, the video for “The Impression That I Get” is minimalism at its worst: It mirrors the artwork from Let’s Face It, but that just makes it a performance video set in some tedious purgatory of infinite white. In that sense, it’s kind of like a version of “Someday I Suppose” with all the liveliest bits removed. Before the suits got to them…rather, before they got to the suits, the Bosstones were total fashion victims. Or perhaps they would prefer “ensembly challenged”? Suspenders, windbreakers, a Stormtroopers of Death baseball hat, and so much goddamned plaid it’s even smearing its way onto the instruments. Don’t get me wrong, I love the whole classy, two-tone, “band in suits” schtick, but there’s something awkwardly endearing about the gangly pranksters on display in “Someday.” They’re cute, in a sort of sweet and nonthreatening way, like Tai in the seconds before she tumbles down those stairs. —Kylie

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d-pi:

thehungryhungryemo:

note-a-bear:

qweent:


Tulsa OK 1921: US Government Bombs US City



National Guard troops patrolling the streets armed. Thousands of black people held in a convention center. Hundreds of black dead, with bodies piled like wood. That was not New Orleans, that was Tulsa, Oklahoma, in June 1921.On May 30, 1921 a young black man named Dick Rowland, stumbled into a white woman, while entering an elevator. He was accused of assault, and arrested the next day. Newly rich from oil Tulsa, was a Ku Klux Klan town. Rowland was sentenced to be hanged. The Tulsa Tribune called for a “Negro lynching tonight.”The white mob was surprised when they were met by several dozen armed black men, dressed in their World War I uniforms. This led to a racist three day destruction of the black neighborhood of Greenwood. The Red Cross reported 300 mostly dead black people.Greenwood called “Little Africa,” was a relatively wealthy community. White mobs, many deputized, destroyed every house, store, church or school. The mob met resistance from an armed black population. Governor Robertson declared martial law. The National Guard arrived with machine gun mounted trucks, and airplanes hovering over Greenwood. It was the first time an American city was bombed from the air, by the US government.Over 6,000 black people, were round up and held in the convention center and fairgrounds, as long as eight days. The homeless were shuttled into a tent city, where typhoid and malnutrition took over. Blacks were allowed out of the convention center, with a tag, with an employers name. Thosands fled the city.Attempts to turn Greenwood into an industrial zone were unsuccessful. For several years, it was deprived of paved streets, running water, and garbage collection.See: Tulsa Reparations Coalition and thank you to Internationalist Group for presenting this story in your newspaper.
RENEGADE EYE
[X]


Always needs to be reblogged

Shit they don’t teach you in school.

d-pi:

thehungryhungryemo:

note-a-bear:

qweent:

Tulsa OK 1921: US Government Bombs US City


National Guard troops patrolling the streets armed. Thousands of black people held in a convention center. Hundreds of black dead, with bodies piled like wood. That was not New Orleans, that was Tulsa, Oklahoma, in June 1921.

On May 30, 1921 a young black man named Dick Rowland, stumbled into a white woman, while entering an elevator. He was accused of assault, and arrested the next day. Newly rich from oil Tulsa, was a Ku Klux Klan town. Rowland was sentenced to be hanged. The Tulsa Tribune called for a “Negro lynching tonight.”

The white mob was surprised when they were met by several dozen armed black men, dressed in their World War I uniforms. This led to a racist three day destruction of the black neighborhood of Greenwood. The Red Cross reported 300 mostly dead black people.

Greenwood called “Little Africa,” was a relatively wealthy community. White mobs, many deputized, destroyed every house, store, church or school. The mob met resistance from an armed black population. Governor Robertson declared martial law. The National Guard arrived with machine gun mounted trucks, and airplanes hovering over Greenwood. It was the first time an American city was bombed from the air, by the US government.

Over 6,000 black people, were round up and held in the convention center and fairgrounds, as long as eight days. The homeless were shuttled into a tent city, where typhoid and malnutrition took over. Blacks were allowed out of the convention center, with a tag, with an employers name. Thosands fled the city.

Attempts to turn Greenwood into an industrial zone were unsuccessful. For several years, it was deprived of paved streets, running water, and garbage collection.

See: Tulsa Reparations Coalition and thank you to Internationalist Group for presenting this story in your newspaper.

RENEGADE EYE

[X]

Always needs to be reblogged

Shit they don’t teach you in school.

(via princessnijireiki)

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